Jesus Heals a Blind Man, Sunday School Lesson April 10, 2011

The Son of Man

Image by Mike Rawlins via Flickr

Listen to Deaconess Pam Nielsen of Concordia Publishing House discuss this week’s Sunday School Lesson with Todd Wilken on Issues Etc.

In John 9, Jesus heals a man blind from birth.  As they pass near this man, Jesus’ disciples pose the question — “Who sinned?  This man or his parents?”  The disciples recognized that man is sinful, but linked the physical disability to a specific sin of the parent or the child.  And while there is a kernel of truth here, namely that our sin has consequences that are felt in this world both physically and spiritually, Jesus, acknowledging that kernel of truth, tells His disciples they miss the bigger point:  This man is blind, so that God’s glory may be revealed in Him. And Jesus, pulls the man aside, spits in the dirt, creates mud, puts the mud on the man’s eyes, and tells the man to go wash in the pool of Siloam.  When he returns, the man can see.

The Pharisees are shocked and dismayed by this act.  They argue that a sinner like this man Jesus, a carpenter’s son whom they know, cannot heal the blind.  Only God can do miracles such as these.  But it is in the creative work of Christ, coming to the blind man, making a healing salve out of spit and mud, speaking to the man the Word of God, and the washing of water which gives the blind man faith to believe.  It is a pure gift of God in Christ and through the Holy Spirit which leads this man to confess that Jesus must be a great prophet.  And when the pharisees finish their questioning, Jesus again seeks out the man, and being the Christ, he confronts the man, “Do you believe in the Son of Man?”  His reply, “Tell me who He is Sir, that I may believe.”  The Spirit has not only opened this man’s eyes to see the world, but his heart has been opened to draw on the well of spiritual knowledge from which he has been fed throughout his life.  And so when Christ, the Cross itself, comes to him and confronts him, the blind man has a sense of hope welling within him.  Having been made ready to receive salvation by the law, Christ reveals Himself to the man.  This was done in the presence of some Pharisees, and Jesus takes the opportunity to reiterate His purpose in coming into this world — for judgment — that those who see or think they see may be made blind, and that those who are blind may be given sight.

Just as Jesus comes to the blind man to heal him, He comes to us, creates in us the faith to believe and receive Him.  Christ openly confronts each one of us with the reality of the Cross and our sinfulness — He  makes us ready to receive salvation, giving us the faith to receive Him.  Blessed are they who have not seen, and yet believe!  Keep us humble dear Christ, that in faith, we may receive you and carry you to others.

Listen to Deaconess Pam Nielsen of Concordia Publishing House discuss this week’s Sunday School Lesson with Todd Wilken on Issues Etc.

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Posted on April 9, 2011, in Sunday School and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 3 Comments.

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  1. Pingback: Are you a Pharisee? Characteristic #12 - Pharisees are spiritually blind

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